Tag Archives: Mark Ames

Antiwar Radio: Mark Ames

Mark Ames, co-editor and writer for The eXiled, discusses the money-making business of war (for the politically connected few), why halfhearted government deregulation of the thoroughly rigged banking system does not create a free market, Alan Greenspan’s lucrative consulting business with the Paulson & Co. hedge fund and how the post-Cold War “peace dividend” was scuttled by the neocon-inspired “unipolar moment.”

Antiwar Radio: Mark Ames

Mark Ames, regular writer for The eXiled, discusses Russia’s transition from neoliberal Yeltsin to nationalist Putin, the US “economic hit men” advisers to Yeltsin who facilitated the rise of the oligarchs, the huge decline in Russian life-expectancy rates in the 1990s, the trail of economic disasters left in Larry Summers‘ wake, how the “cakewalk” victory of Gulf War I increased American bravado and militarism, the end of US meritocracy and why a more vigorous opposition is needed to stop the War Party.

Antiwar Radio: Mark Ames

Mark Ames, author of the article “Obama Is Leading the U.S. Into a Hellish Quagmire“, discusses the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan that surpasses the levels during Soviet occupation, how Russia benefits from (and is gloating about) a U.S./Taliban stalemate, the slim chance of Russia’s inclusion in NATO and George F. Will’s “Walter Cronkite moment” on Afghanistan.

Antiwar Radio: Mark Ames

Mark Ames, journalist for The Nation and eXiled Online, discusses recent history leading up to the current mess in former Soviet Georgia, Mikheil Saakashvili’s downward spiral, the broken Georgian economy, rumors that U.S. advisers participated to some extent in Georgia’s invastion of S. Ossetia last summer, Georgia’s relationship with Israel and America’s relationship with Russia.

Antiwar Radio: Mark Ames

Mark Ames, author of “The Cold War that Wasn’t” in The Nation, discusses the dominant narrative and ideological underpinnings in the U.S. press regarding the recent Georgian attack on South Ossetia and subsequent Russian counterattack on Georgia, the attempt to portray Russia as the aggressor by floating the idea of a first-strike cyber war despite the lack of any evidence, the alleged poisoning of Ukraine’s Victor Yushchenko and the current dispute between Yushchenko and Yulia Timoshenko over her reaction to the Georgia war, the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko, NATO expansion into Eastern Europe, the precedent set by U.S. intervention in Kosovo, the danger of putting “defensive” missiles in Eastern Europe while the U.S. foreign policy establishment contemplates first strike capability, U.S. NED support for the Russian National Bolsheviks, the “shock therapy” robbery of Russian resources under Yeltsin’s autocracy in the 1990s and the consequences.