Tag Archives: Daphne Eviatar

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the UN report on widespread torture in Afghan-run detention facilities; the difficulty of assessing US torture-prevention programs that are kept secret; discarding established conventions for prisoners of war, as the US makes up new rules and prisoner classifications on the fly; and how, ten years after 9/11, indefinite detention in military custody has become the new normal.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses her recent report about the shoddy and lawless process for dealing with detainees at Bagram prison in Afghanistan, the secret JSOC prison nearby, the huge numbers of people swept up in night raids and the many at Bagram arrested on accusations from informers who use US to settle tribal/personal vendettas.

April 11 – Today on Antiwar Radio

Listen Live from 9:00 AM PT – 12:00 AM PT

http://lrn.fm/

Guests: The other Scott Horton, Daphne Eviatar, Adam Morrow

Today on Antiwar radio with Scott Horton:

Scott Horton will be on to discuss the Bradley Manning case. In particular, Horton will talk about how over 250 prominent American scholars have signed a letter in protest of the detention and treatment of Manning.

Background:

  • Read the letter here
  • Read an article about the letter and the scholars here

Bio: Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor of Harper’s Magazine and writer of the No Comment blog. He is an attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict. Mr. Horton also lectures at the Columbia University. See his blog here.

Daphne Eviatar will be on to discuss the latest revelations of US secret prisons in Afghanistan. See here for background here.

Bio: Daphne Eviatar is a Senior Associate in Human Rights First’s Law and Security Program who investigates and reports on U.S. national security policies and practices and their human rights implications.

Daphne is a lawyer and award-winning journalist who has written widely about law, human rights and economic development. A former legal correspondent for The Washington Independent, her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek International, Harper’s and many others.

Visit Human Rights First here.

Adam Morrow will be on to talk about the military clashes in Egypt over the weekend. Read his latest piece here.

For background read the following:

Bio: Adam Morrow is a reporter with IPS News working out of Cairo, Egypt

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Listen Live from 9:00 AM PT – 12:00 AM PT

http://lrn.fm/

Join the discussion live at:

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Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the relatively fair federal trial that ended in Ahmed Ghailani‘s conviction of a conspiracy charge related to the 1998 (US) Africa embassy bombings, another example of a civilian terrorism trial with a guilty verdict and no security threats (despite the fear-mongering of Liz Cheney’s Keep America Safe group), the far harsher sentences given in federal terrorism trials than in Guantanamo’s military commissions and why the prosecution of child-soldier Omar Khadr for war crimes is itself a war crime.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the circumstances surrounding Omar Khadr’s capture and incarceration in Afghanistan at the age of 15 in 2002, the Military Commissions judge’s decision to allow the admissibility of a confession extracted under threat of death, the irony of the U.S. prosecuting Khadr for war crimes while sponsoring amnesty and rehabilitation for child soldiers in Africa, the purging of jurors who had any negative opinion on Guantanamo prison or U.S. foreign policy and the question of just who committed war crimes (Khadr – unarmed – was shot twice in the back).

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the trial of Guantanamo prisoner Omar Khadr, the unconstitutional retroactive application of the Military Commissions Act, the US government’s apparent loss of faith in the civilian criminal court system, why the most radical of legal proposals come from supposed political “moderates” like Joe Lieberman, the sparse US mainstream media presence at Khadr’s hearings and the individual frustrations of those beholden to an unaccountable government.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the inefficient and bizarre proceedings of Guantanamo’s military commissions, the steady erosion of Constitutional protections for foreigners and US citizens alike, the few indications that Obama has improved on Bush administration torture practices and the revelation from Lawrence Wilkerson (former chief of staff  to Secretary of State Colin Powell) that Bush knew many Gitmo inmates were innocent.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the preemptive legal defenses trotted out by John Yoo and Dick Cheney, information missing or withheld from the DOJ’s Office of Professional Responsibility’s torture memo investigation, the incompatibility of Yoo’s extralegal commander-in-chief theory with any semblance of Constitutional rule of law and why a post-apartheid South Africa-style truth commission may be the best resolution of Bush administration crimes we can hope for.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the Brookings Institution study that recommends codifying indefinite detention without trial, the government’s refusal to release some Guantanamo detainees who won their habeas corpus hearings and how the never ending “war on terror” complicates the traditional practice of holding prisoners “for the duration.”

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Lawyer and freelance journalist Daphne Eviatar discusses the upcoming release of the DOJ misconduct investigation OCR report, the possible impeachment of federal judge (and former White House OLC lawyer) Jay Bybee, the numerous excuses Obama and Eric Holder invent to avoid prosecuting Bush administration officials, the Republican fear of public trials for terrorism suspects and how Holder’s guarantee of terrorist convictions suggests that the justice system is rigged.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Lawyer and freelance journalist Daphne Eviatar discusses newly discovered interrogation video of Guantanamo detainee Mohammed al Qahtani, how Obama’s “move forward” rhetoric undermines Eric Holder’s torture investigation, the broad application and abuse of increased law enforcement powers meant to specifically combat terrorism, John Durham’s glacial-paced investigation of missing CIA tapes and the minimal protests in Congress against renewing the Patriot Act.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Lawyer and freelance journalist Daphne Eviatar discusses Guantanamo detainee Mohamed Jawad’s legal limbo, the DOJ/U.S. military payment to prosecution witnesses in Afghanistan, the political peril in releasing the “worst of the worst” from custody and how even a limited torture investigation could potentially climb up the chain of command.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Daphne Eviatar, writer for The Washington Independent, discusses the torture evidence against Guantanamo detainee Mohammed Jawad that Obama’s DOJ won’t drop, routine torture at Bagram, Eric Holder’s use of verbal gymnastics to avoid explicitly calling the Bush wiretapping policy a crime and the disappearance of the “enemy combatant” designation but not the policy of indefinite detention.

Antiwar Radio: Daphne Eviatar

Lawyer and freelance journalist Daphne Eviatar discusses Obama’s plan to keep Bush’s Military Commissions Act powers over the American people and bring the Guantanamo legal system to the U.S. and the recent Supreme Court ruling